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Ontario 2017 Budget

Ontario Finance Minister Charles Sousa delivered the province’s 2017 budget on April 27, 2017. The province’s 2017 budget is balanced, with projected balanced budgets for 2018 and 2019.

Corporate Income Tax Measures

No changes to corporate taxes were announced.

Corporate Income Tax Rates- As of January 1, 2017
Ontario Combined Federal & Ont
General 11.5% 26.5%
M&P 10.0% 25.0%
Small Business* 4.5% 15.0%
*on first $500,000 of active business income
  • Review of tax planning strategies involving private corporations: Ontario intends to review tax planning strategies involving private corporations
    • Income splitting with family members
    • Passive investment portfolio inside a corporation
    • Converting regular business income to capital gains
  • Employer Health Tax Exemption: Changes to prevent the multiplication of Employer Health Tax exemption for CCPCs.
  • Small Business Deduction limit: Parallel changes made to the federal small business deduction by the same amount the federal business limit is reduced

Personal Income Tax Measures

No changes to personal taxes were announced.

Personal Combined Federal/Provincial Top Marginal Rates
2017
Interest and regular income 53.53%
Capital gains 26.76%
Eligible dividends 39.34%
Non-eligible dividends 45.30%
  • Caregiver Tax Credit: This new non-refundable 5.05% credit is available in respect of relatives who are infirm dependents, including adult children of the claimant or of the claimant’s spouse or common‐law partner
  • Ontario Seniors’ Public Transit Credit: Ontario Seniors’ Public Transit Tax Credit for all Ontarians aged 65 or older.
  • Property and land tax measures: Adjust the rules on land transfer tax including preventing qualifying purchasers from claiming their spouse’s interest for the first‐time homebuyers refund if the spouse is not a Canadian citizen or permanent resident of Canada.

Please don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions.

Federal Budget 2017: Business

Finance Minister Bill Morneau delivered the government’s 2017 federal budget on March 22, 2017. The budget expects a deficit of $23 billion for fiscal 2016-2017 and forecasts a deficit of $28.5 billion for 2017-2018. Find out what this means for businesses.

Small Business

  • No changes to income tax rates
  • No changes to capital gains inclusion rate

Tax Planning using private companies

While no specific measures are mentioned, the government will review the use of tax planning strategies involving private corporations “that inappropriately reduce personal taxes of high-income earners.” including:

  • Income Splitting: Reducing taxes by income splitting with family members who are subject to lower personal tax rates.
  • Regular income to Capital Gains: Converting income to capital gains (instead of income being taxed as dividends)
  • Passive income inside Corporation: Since corporate income tax rates are generally lower than personal tax rates, this strategy can facilitate the accumulation of earnings by owners of private corporations.

For Professionals

The government eliminated a tax deferral opportunity for certain professionals. Accountants, dentists, lawyers, medical doctors, veterinarians and chiropractors will no longer be able to elect to exclude the value of work in progress in computing their income. This will be phased-in over two taxation years, starting with taxation years that begin after this budget.

Please don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions.

Federal Budget 2017 Families

Finance Minister Bill Morneau delivered the government’s 2017 federal budget on March 22, 2017. The budget expects a deficit of $23 billion for fiscal 2016-2017 and forecasts a deficit of $28.5 billion for 2017-2018. Find out what this means for families.

Key points for families

  • Childcare: The funding could serve to create more affordable childcare spaces for low-income families.
  • Parental leave: Extending parental leave and benefits to 18 months, Parents who choose to stay at home longer, however, will have to make do with a lower Employment Insurance (EI) benefit rate of 33 per cent of their average weekly earnings, instead of the current rate of 55 per cent.
  • Caregiver benefit: Introduce a new caregiver benefit that’s meant to help families copy with illnesses and injuries.
  • Parents who go to school: Single, higher federal income threshold for part-time students to receive Canada Student Grants. Grants don’t have to be repaid.
  • Foreign Nannies: Waiving a $1,000 processing fee required to obtain a work permit.

Please don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions.